The Attrition DC26 Badge Challenge Post Mortem

This year, which was my final trip to DEF CON, I made up one last round of Attrition DEF CON badges. In prior years they were typically engraved luggage tags a bit more specific to the year:

Since #BadgeLife has become a big thing, especially this year as far as I can tell, I decided to go a bit lower rent on the badge material but ‘up the game’ on the content. I did a ‘cipher challenge’, which of course was never meant to be a real challenge. I’m not nearly smart enough for that shit. I literally came up with it in less than a day, didn’t vet it with anyone, and just moved to mock up a badge and print. Because I am so pro! I also figured anyone who knows me would know not to trust me on anything ‘cipher’ or ‘challenge’, especially ‘cipher challenge’. Unfortunately, and I do feel bad, a handful of badge-holders went down this rabbit hole.

This write-up is for them, to explain just how fast this was put together, and the lessons I learned as well. The cliff notes details, as I originally intended:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cirth (hobbit) -> “never trust us”
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wingdings -> “except this time”
  3. location hint (flamingo hotel) -> “Phoenicopteriformes”
  4. refined location – wildlife habitat long/lat -> 36.11662720392657 / -115.17115294683322
  5. 08/11/2018 @ 3:04am (UTC) Epoch Unix Time -> “1533956647”
  6. Klingon “take proof you were there” -> “pa’ SoH’a’ tob tlhap”
  7. random letters/numbers -> (unsolvable/gibberish)
  8. show Jericho proof (latin) -> ostende inamabilis sciurus
  9. winner winner chicken dinner -> (icons)

Seems pretty straight forward! Unfortunately, a few of these didn’t work out so well as I found out, in surprising ways. Here are the hiccups I didn’t expect.

  • (1) There are multiple Cirth character sets. Pretty minor, but it led to a couple people saying the translation was off. Worse? That one character that was off fed into another hint and made it more believable. I should have read through the Wikipedia article to notice that, but growing up as a skilled writer in ‘Tolkein Runic’ (Cirth), I didn’t think about it.
  • (2) Always trust the first hint, never the second!
  • (5) So… Epoch Unix Time is an absolute. You don’t adjust for timezones, because the time is in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The Wikipedia entry for UTC confirms it “is not adjusted for daylight saving time“. So my intention of it being on Saturday morning at 3:04am was correct. I didn’t account for everyone adjusting for time zones. I also didn’t account for some adjusting for Las Vegas’ time zone (Pacific) or trying to second-guess it and using my time zone (Mountain). At this point I am vindicated, anyone loitering around flamingos at the Flamingo between ~ 8p – 10p local time, were not following the cipher. Yes, I still feel bad they showed up thinking there was a prize/reward there.
  • (6) I really should have known better here, since Google Translate fails to translate simple text from one language to another, and then back again. I fell to this trap using the first Klingon translator that Google offered and did a simple one-way translation. Unfortunately, that same site changed “take proof you were there” drastically to involve something with a cat in it. I like cats, everyone knows this, so the clue still had some crazy merit. Fortunately for me, one of the badge-holders knows a lot more about Klingon than the online translators do, and gave me a deserved verbal beratement over the horrible translation. This led me back to that translator, where I pasted “pa’ SoH’a’ tob tlhap” back into it and got, you guessed it… “you take a cat room“. This was a solid break in the intended chain, and a deal breaker for solving the badge. Oops.
  • (7) This line had a simple intention. This line may have been the weirdest in the long run. A bunch of random numbers and letters, with no intended meaning, to be an ultimate ‘gotcha’. So no one could say they solved it, or if they did, I could challenge them on that line. I left this up to the wonderful badge artist, Anushika, who typed in a random string while designing it. Between that and the chosen font, there was even question over one or two characters. Either way, I thought it served a purpose. One nice lady from Australia (she is nice, despite her DMs irrationally suggesting I not to call her that) spent a lot of time on this, maybe more than anyone else. At one point she messaged “Threw it through successive shifts. And the answer it gave me was successive shifts.” This was after I reminded her on previous comments, that “i’m not really bright. hashed, encrypted, encoded… i get so confused“. No false modesty or deception; math is a religion, and I don’t believe. Ergo, crypto is a foreign language to me for the most part. So that random line had some merit in the math world maybe? Put it through successive shifts, and the answer is more successive shifts. That certainly sounds like I was really brilliant in a troll cipher, when I was the farthest thing from it. She kind of spooked me when she told me that and I thought “oh shit, this line has meaning?!” Kind of disappointed that a ‘troll cipher’ isn’t a real thing with a Wikipedia entry!
  • (8) Translation woes again. As someone who took a year of Latin in high school, seriously, and knows about the headache of online translators… not sure how I got burned twice in one badge. I translated “show squirrel proof” since I knew it wouldn’t handle “jericho”, and got “ostende inamabilis sciurus“. This is where it gets really weird. Someone messaged while in Vegas that the translation was off, and I went to check again, using Google Translate again. Click that link and you will see the problem. The translation changed between making the badge, and someone translating it after receiving the badge, which was around 30 – 40 days. So now it became “inamabilis sciurus ostendit probationem“. This caused a problem because the first translation now reverses as “show squirrel” which is lacking a crucial word. The updated translation, when reversed, comes back as “squirrel proof shows“, which is a bit closer to the intent. Ugh. For fun, since we had to pick ‘Latin’ nicknames in my Latin class, I chose Sylvester. #JerichoTrivia

So there you go badge-holders and adventure-seekers! I sincerely apologize for any hardship you went through, to a degree, because that first line really is gospel when it comes to me, attrition, and anything remotely close to a challenge. Years prior, I wanted to do a luggage tag badge like those pictured above, but cut out holes in a Goonies sort of way along with instructions to stand in the middle of Las Vegas Blvd to line up three landmarks to figure out where the party was. After this badge challenge? Probably for the best I didn’t, or I bet I would have gotten a few people run over. On the upside, you got to spend time with Flamingos, largely more bearable than the average DEF CON attendee.

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