“The History of CVE” and A Couple of Objections

I just read “The History of Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)” by Ary Widdes from Tripwire and found it to be a great summary of the 20+ years of the program. I say that as an outspoken CVE and MITRE critic even! I do have a couple of objections however, with the conclusion, and then a fun bounty!

Widdes concludes the history by saying:

A lot has changed in the 21 years since the CVE List’s inception – both in terms of technology and vulnerabilities. Without the CVE List, it’s possible that security professionals would still be using multiple tools from multiple vendors just to ensure complete coverage. It’s also possible that someone else would have created a service similar to the CVE List. Either way, from idea to whitepaper to database, the CVE List has become a core part of vulnerability and patch management.

There’s a lot to unpack here so I will take it one sentence at a time, starting with the second.

“Without the CVE List, it’s possible that security professionals would still be using multiple tools from multiple vendors just to ensure complete coverage.”

No, there is no “possible” here. That is a simple reality with an important caveat. The reality is that teams of all types still use multiple tools from multiple vendors to do their job. The caveat, and more to the point of that sentence, is that CVE doesn’t offer “complete coverage” and many of the vulnerability scanners only cover a third of the issues in CVE for various reasons. Even using a combination of firewalls, vulnerability scanners, intrusion detection/prevention, audits, and a slew of other tools, organizations are likely seeing half of what CVE has to offer at best. Widdes’ conclusion here gives undue credit to CVE and the state of vulnerability coverage it offers.

It’s also possible that someone else would have created a service similar to the CVE List.

This is where the vulnerability historian in me wants to rage a bit. This statement is unequivocally false for the simple reason that vulnerability databases existed before CVE, both free (e.g. X-Force) and commercial (e.g. RSI), in 1997 alone [1]. The first vulnerability database was created in 1973, specific to Multics, but also when there weren’t that many other systems to catalog bugs or vulnerabilities in. In 1983 we saw the Mt Xinu Bug List and in 1985 Matt Bishop’s List of UNIX Holes, both of which were more comprehensive than one platform. If we consider a vulnerability database implemented via product, we had ISS, SATAN, Ballista, and Nessus between 1995 and the creation of CVE in 1999. Many of the hackers turned security professionals may fondly remember Fyodor’s Exploit World (1996 – 1998) from both aspects of their lives. Those same folks probably also remember Packet Storm (1998) which is still running today.

Either way, from idea to whitepaper to database, the CVE List has become a core part of vulnerability and patch management.

This, unfortunately, is true. I say unfortunately because of my long-standing criticisms of CVE over the past decade, but won’t go into here.

Bug(s) Bounty:

If there is anyone at MITRE open to outright bribery, including all-you-can-eat sushi dinners, I will pay a bounty to get my hands on that list of 8,400 submissions! While I know there are likely a lot of duplicates, the vulnerability historian in me would love to audit that data to see if MITRE decided to skip any that would be considered vulnerabilities by today’s standards, or where someone else back then had more knowledge of a vulnerability than was submitted. That data is over twenty years old and was solicited, processed, and partially published with U.S. taxpayer funded money. There’s no reason not to make it public. =)

[1] The Repent Security Inc. (RSI) database existed in 1997 but may not have been offered as a commercial product until 1998.

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