A critique of the summary of “Latent Feature Vulnerability Rankings of CVSS Vectors”

What do you think of this?” It always starts out simple. A friend asked this question of an article titled Summary of “Latent Feature Vulnerability Rankings of CVSS Vectors”. This study is math heavy and that is not my jam. But vulnerability databases are, and that includes the CVE ecosystem which encompasses NVD. I am also pretty familiar with limitations of the CVSS scoring system and colleagues at RBS have written extensively on them.

I really don’t have the time or desire to dig into this too heavily, but my response to the friend was “immediately problematic“. I’ll cliff notes some of the things that stand out to me, starting with the first graphic included which she specifically asked me about.

  • The header graphic displays the metrics for the CVSSv3 scoring system, but is just labeled “CVSS”. Not only is this sloppy, it belies an important point of this summary that the paper’s work is based on CVSSv2 scores, not CVSSv3. They even qualify that just below: “We should note the analysis conducted by Ross et al. is based upon the CVSS Version 2 scoring system…
  • Ross et al. note that many exploits exist without associated CVE-IDs. For example, only 9% of the Symantec data is associated with a CVE-ID. The authors offered additional caveats related to their probability calculation.” That sounds odd, but it is readily explained above when they summarize what that data is: “Symantec’s Threat Database (SYM): A database extracted from Symantec by Allodi and Massacci that contains references to over 1000 vulnerabilities.” First, that data set contains a lot more than vulnerabilities. Second, if Symantec is really sitting on over 900 vulnerabilities that don’t have a CVE ID, then as a CNA they should either assign them an ID or work with MITRE to get an ID assigned. Isn’t that the purpose of CVE?
  • Ross et al. use four datasets reporting data on vulnerabilities and CVSS scores…” and then we see one dataset is “Exploit Database (Exploit-DB): A robust database containing a large collection of vulnerabilities and their corresponding public exploit(s).” Sorry, EDB doesn’t assign CVSS scores so the only ones that would be present are ones given by the people disclosing the vulnerabilities via EDB, some of whom are notoriously unreliable. While EDB is valuable in the disclosure landscape, serving as a dataset of CVSS scores is not one of them.
  • About 2.7% of the CVE entries in the dataset have an associated exploit, regardless of the CVSS V2 score.” This single sentence is either very poorly written, or it is all the evidence you need that the authors of the paper simply don’t understand vulnerabilities and disclosures. With a simple search of VulnDB, I can tell you at least 55,280 vulnerabilities have a CVE and a public exploit. There were 147,490 live CVE IDs as of last night meaning that is almost 38% that have a public exploit. Not sure how they arrived at 2.7% but that number should have been immediately suspect.
  • In other words, less than half of the available CVSS V2 vector space had been explored despite thousands of entries…” Well sure, this statement doesn’t qualify one major reason for that. Enumerate all the possible CVSSv2 metric combinations and derive their scores, then look at which numbers don’t show up on that list. A score of 0.1 through 0.7 is not possible for example. Then weed out the combinations that are extremely unlikely to appear in the wild, which is most that have “Au:M” as an example, and it weeds out a lot of possible values.
  • Only 17 unique CVSS vectors described 80% of the NVD.” Congrats on figuring out a serious flaw in CVSSv2! Based on the 2.7% figure above, I would immediately question the 80% here too. That said, there is a serious weighting of scores primarily in web application vulnerabilities where e.g. an XSS, SQLi, RFI, LFI, and limited code execution could all overlap heavily.
  • Input: Vulnerabilities (e.g., NVD), exploit existence, (e.g., Exploit-DB), the number of clusters k” This is yet another point where they are introducing a dataset they don’t understand and make serious assumptions about. Just because something is posted to EDB does not mean it is a public exploit. Another quick search of VulnDB tells us there are at least 733 EDB entries that are actually not a vulnerability. This goes back to the reliability of the people submitting content to the site.
  • The authors note their approach outperforms CVSS scoring when compared to Exploit-DB.” What does this even mean? Exploit-DB does not do CVSS scoring! How can you compare their approach to a site that doesn’t do it in the first place?

Perhaps this summary is not well written and the paper actually has more merit? I doubt it, the summary seems like it is comprehensive and captures key points, but I don’t think the summary author works with this content either. Stats and math yes. Vulnerabilities no.

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