The Rundown: CVE IDs & REJECT Status

For analysts and practitioners that digest CVE regularly, you will likely be familiar with CVEs that are in REJECT status. If you are new to CVE or not familiar with some of the more gritty details, a CVE assignment may be rejected for various reasons. When that happens, it will receive a capitalized REJECT status:

The REJECT links to a page that offers more information, but as of April, 2021, actually links to the correct page but the wrong anchor. I’ll link to the correct anchor for your reference, which gives us several reason an ID might be rejected including “it being a duplicate CVE Record, it being withdrawn by the original requester, it being assigned incorrectly, or some other administrative reason.

At the time of this blog, there are almost 9,500 IDs that have been rejected. A significant portion of those come from MITRE being more proactive and enforcing that CVE Numbering Authorities (CNA) reject unused IDs from prior years, along with a general increase in the total CVE assigned per year.

The process of rejecting, and the presence of REJECT entries is straightforward.

That’s right, if I am taking the time to blog about a topic seemingly so easy, there’s probably more to it. In this case, I wanted to point out a couple examples of CVE IDs that are in REJECT status, but highlight issues. The first is a simple one that underscores that the process of CNAs rejecting CVE IDs may have a problem, or that MITRE has an issue in the way they described the rejected ID. We’ll take CVE-2018-1226 (archive), that was rejected because “The CNA or individual who requested this candidate did not associate it with any vulnerability during 2018. Notes: none.” That is easy enough, right? The problem is that it was rejected by March 19, 2018. Not even a quarter of the way through 2018 and it was rejected because it was not associated with a vulnerability that year? That seems problematic. I’m sure there is a good explanation for this, but the description sure doesn’t do it.

You may think that pointing that out is pedantic, and you are right. However, there is an important reason we need to be pedantic and expect accurate descriptions from CVE, even for a rejected entry. What if the REJECT message was factually incorrect? What if that CVE ID represented a valid vulnerability that impacted your organization? If you rely on CVE/NVD you would have a blinds pot as a result of errors in their process, which are critical to you. Looking at two older rejected CVE IDs as an example, CVE-2015-0788 (archive) and CVE-2015-0789 (archive), we see that both are in REJECT status because they were not associated with a vulnerability in 2015.

Looking closer, we can see that the assigning CNA was Micro Focus International. As such they should be the single source of truth and provenance for any vulnerability information associated with those CVEs. MITRE would be secondary and should not necessarily be trusted if there is a dispute. In this case, there is a dispute in the form of NetIQ Identity Manager release notes listing both CVEs as fixed issues in version 4.5 Service Pack 2.

NetIQ was founded in 1995, acquired by Attachmate in 2006, and then acquired by Micro Focus in 2014. With this document we see the conflict where Micro Focus says that they were assigned, represented legitimate vulnerabilities, and were fixed and CVE says they are rejected.

The takeaway here is that while a CVE may be listed as REJECTed, trust, but verify.

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